Category Archives: individuality

Miss Paul and the President by Dean Robbins

Miss Paul and the President by Dean Robbins

Today’s Perfect Picture Book pick is Miss Paul and the President: The Creative Campaign for Women’s Right to Vote. 

Written by: Dean Robbins

Illustrated by:  Nancy Zhang

Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers  (September 2016)

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes/Topics: Activism, Right to vote, Women’s suffrage, US history

Brief Synopsis:  As a child Alice Paul saw her father go off to vote but not her mother. Why?  She studied the nation’s laws and knew they needed to change to allow women the right to vote. Alice protested in different ways and convinced other women to join her.

One day in 1914 she organized a parade that upstaged the arrival of the newly elected President, Woodrow Wilson. He asked to meet her. However the president told her he had more pressing issues to deal with that working on the women’s right to vote . But that didn’t stop Alice Paul. She persisted. Even the president’s daughter Margaret agreed with Alice Paul. Then one day in 1918, President Wilson agreed too!

Opening pages:

Alice Paul hurried up and down Pennsylvania Avenue in a purple hat.

She wanted to make everything perfect for her parade. A parade in Washington D. C. no one would ever forget!”

 Why I like this book This is a wonderful introduction to a female activist who was instrumental in the fight for the right to vote for women. Through scenes that are both playful and serious, Robbins tells the story of activism by describing the actions and persistence of Alice Paul. 

The book is a wonderful introduction to this period in history and could spark discussion about the US Constitution as well as the role of Congress in making laws. 

Resources

  • Scroll down the author’s website for Activities for Miss Paul and the President: The Creative Campaign for Women’s Right to Vote. 

  •  A teaching unit about women’s suffrage movement can be found from Rutgers: Teach a Girl to Lead

  • Head over to A Mighty Girl to find girl-empowering resources such as toys, movies, music and books. 

Read more of today’s reviews at author Susanna Hill’s blog.

Happy reading!

Please follow and like us:

BunnyBear – A Perfect Picture Book Friday Review

BunnyBear – A Perfect Picture Book Friday Review

I am fortunate to have read an advanced copy of BunnyBear, my pick for today’s Perfect Picture Book Friday. What a delightful story!

Written by:  Andrea J. Loney

Illustrated by: Carmen Saldaña

PublisherAlbert Whitman & Company (January 31, 2017)

Suitable for ages: 5-8

Themes/Topics: bears, identity, being yourself, friendship, acceptance

Brief Synopsis: What should a bear do when he feels like a bunny? And other bears called him odd. He wiggled his nose, nibbled on strawberries, and bounced through the forest of course!

Author Andrea Loney tells the story about a bear who did what felt natural because “It made him feel free and light and happy.” Even though others did not always understand, Bunnybear finds out he is not the only animal whose identity is at odds with social norms. Readers will celebrate the importance of staying true to who you are on the inside, despite what you look like on the outside.

Opening pages:

“There was once a bear who was more than a bear.

Sure, he was shaggy and stompy like most bears.  And he could be loud-very loud-if he wanted to.

But when he was alone, he loved to bounce through  he forest, wiggle his nose, and nibble on strawberries. It made him feel free and light and happy.”

 Why I like this book: BunnyBear is a wonderful story to introduce kids to the idea that it’s more  important to know who you are, be yourself and be happy rather than try to live in a way that doesn’t feel right to please others.

Being different can be difficult and lonely for kids. This story gives them hope. They learn that being true to your natural self means you don’t have to be alone. And somewhere there are friends who will accept you for who you are. The theme of this story is “Just be you.”

Resources: K-8 Classroom article, Express Yourself! Encouraging Kids to Be Themselves

Here is an article from kidshealth.org about self-esteem.

The website All Done Monkey lists these picture books about being yourself.

No Time for Flashcards picture books about being different and learning to be yourself.

Susanna Hill’s book lists on Acceptance/Tolerance and Be Yourself/Individuality.

Chapter Two “I’m Special” and Chapter Six “I Like Myself” from author Vivian Kirkfield‘s book Show Me How! Build Your Child’s Self-Esteem Through Reading, Crafting and Cooking has many activities appropriate activities.

To read more reviews of today’s picks, visit author Susanna Hill’s blog.

Happy reading!

Please follow and like us:

Suki’s Kimono

Suki’s Kimono
Title: Suki’s Kimono
Written by:  Chieri Uegaki
Illustrated by: Stéphanie Jorisch
Kids Can Press,  2003, Fiction
Suitable for ages: 3-8
Themes/Topics: celebrating individuality, determination, cultural awareness, tolerance, acceptance
 
Brief Synopsis:  Suki’s decided to wear her kimono, a gift from her grandmother, on the first day of school. Although her sisters did not want her to, Suki wears it anyway. On her way to school the kids laughed at her, but Suki’s kimono helps her relive those happy summer memories of her Japanese grandmother’s visit and all the things they did together. Her classmates also laugh and tease her but when it’s her turn to share what she did over summer break, Suki’s enthusiasm and joy is mesmerizing.
 
Opening pages:  “On the first day of school, suki wanted to wear her kimono. Her sisters did not approve. “You can’t wear that,” said Mari. “People will think you’re weird.”
“You can’t wear that,” said Yumi. “Everyone will laugh, and no one will play with you,’’ said Yumi.
‘’You need something new, Suki.” You need something cool.’’
 
Why I like this book: Suki demonstrates her individuality by choosing to wear a kimomo to school even when her sisters disapprove and warn her it may be an unpopular choice. The dialog between Suki and a girl on the playground who asks her about her “funny’’ clothing and Suki ‘s explanation shows that it’s okay to question as long as you are open to understanding another’s opinion. Suki is delighted to both show and tell her classmates about the summer spent with her Japanese grandmother. Suki’s teacher and the classmates realize wearing the kimono helps her recreate those happy summer memories.  And from Suki we learn that despite being laughed at or teased for doing something  different, sometimes it just doesn’t matter.
 
1d69581d849bf98f034319a823b19f61
Please follow and like us: