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Louisiana Book Award Nomination

I am thrilled to announce that Louisiana readers nominated OPENING THE ROAD for a Louisiana Readers’ Choice Award! This is such an honor, and I am beyond grateful to know this work of nonfiction is resonating with kids. Click here to find a list of other titles nominated for this award.

How exciting to know my book is hanging out with the Newbery Medal winning book by a fellow Kidlit For Growing Minds member, Rajani LaRocca.

Merci beaucoup to my home state!

Recipes

Summer Squash Casserole

Whatcha gonna do with all that summer squash? Here’s a yummy idea. NOM-NOM-NOM!

SUMMER SQUASH CASSEROLE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 cups squash (about 2 large squash), sliced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Vidalia onion, diced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 sleeve of butter crackers (Ritz, Townhouse, etc.), crushed
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup Parmesan, shredded
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 2 tbsp butter, softened

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and grease a baking dish.
  2. Sauté onions 2-3 minutes in olive oil over medium heat.
  3. Add the squash, ¼ cup water, cover and steam ~5 minutes until squash is tender.

Dry mix for the topping:

  • Put crushed crackers in a large bowl with cheese, toss.
  • Set aside half of the cracker-cheese mix in another bowl.

Dry + wet mix:

  • In the large bowl, stir in milk, beaten eggs and melted butter.
  • Add in steamed squash and onion. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Pour into a greased baking dish.
  • Top with ½ of the dry cracker mix and then with softened butter.
  • Bake about 25-30 minutes until top is lightly browned.
Recipes

Salata Baladi (Egyptian Cucumber & Tomato Salad)

What can we do with all the cucumbers and tomatoes our gardens are gifting us this summer? I made Salata Baladi, an old favorite I learned to make in Cairo. It’s healthy, quick to assemble, and most of the ingredients grow in our summer gardens and are staples on our kitchen shelves. You can make this easy peasy recipe or add more herbs and veggies as you like. Hope you enjoy. Afwan! You’re welcome!

Salata Baladi (Egyptian Cucumber & Tomato Salad)

  • 2 cups cucumbers, diced
  • 2 cups firm plum tomatoes, diced
  • 1 small red onion, diced
  • 2 tbsp parsley leaves
  • 1 tbsp dried mint
  • 1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2-3 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp white vinegar
  • salt and pepper to taste

1. Dice cucumbers, tomatoes, onion, and parsley, add to bowl.

2. Add oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

3. Rub mint in the palm of your hands over bowl. Toss together.

4. Serve with tahini and warm Aish Baladi (Egyptian Flat Bread).

Tips:

  1. If preparing it well before serving, add the salt later because it draws out moisture. And refrigerate.
  2. Plum tomatoes are the sweetest, but cherry or grape tomatoes work, too.
  3. Add a touch of sumac or other spices, and veggies like bell pepper, carrots, etc.
  4. If you use more acidic tomatoes or like a sweeter salad flavor, add a bit of sugar.

Picture books, School Visits, Writing Craft

Author Visit: Aga Khan Academy, Kenya

I am thrilled to have had my first in-person school visits with kids since the height of the pandemic at Aga Khan Academy in Mombasa, Kenya in June. Aga Khan Academy – Mombasa is a primary through secondary dual language, International Baccalaureate World School, with a residential option. Student leadership and community service are important strands within their school programming. The school admin, teachers, and support staff are incredibly dedicated and hardworking. I am thrilled to have had my first in-person school visits with kids since the height of the pandemic at this amazing school. The students made this visit so much fun!

I visited with Year 3, 4, 5 students in the primary school; read The King Cake Baby to the younger class and OPENING THE ROAD to the older classes. And they did some writing too. Students knew about Carnevale and one student even knew about Mardi Gras! They have also learned US history and that people are treated differently in America because of the color of their skin. And now they know more, soaked up that knowledge like little sponges. It was so good to be back among our future leaders. Some things are truly universal because one student asked how old I am! I told her old enough to be her grandmother. LOL!

My last visit was with Year 7 – middle school aged kids. The school asked me to discuss poetry. I promised they will love the poems I’d share from NO VOICE TOO SMALL. Then asked them to “show me” what mood they were in, because poetry is all about emotion and, at their age, they have experienced all kind of moods! HA. At first they were a little reserved, then I struck some poses, some cracked up, and joined in! Middle schoolers! I showed them the video of Charles Waters reading his spoken word poem about DJ Annie Red and they were hooked! They gasped at the story about Noah Barnes and were impressed with how Lindsay H. Metcalf followed rules to write a Tanka sequence about him. And of course I bragged about my friend Marcie Rinka Wessels, who writes beautiful and thoughtful Haiku, then shared my silly version “How to Haiku” when discussing voice. After the presentation, a teacher told me she saw a few boys chatting, walked over wondering what they were up to and they were engaged in a conversation about what is and isn’t poetry while discussing rap music. She was so happy! For the writing part, they started brainstorming and will write bio poems.

What a blast to be with kids again, and to visit with students at Aga Khan Academy – Mombasa.

Recipes

Creole Louisiana Jambalaya

I’m all about the easy and some folks call Louisiana the Big Easy, so today I’m sharing my Creole Louisiana Jambalaya made with Tony Chachere’s Creole Jambalaya Mix. It’s a pretty easy one pot dish but made differently from the directions on the box. I add a little extra. Back home we call that lagniappe. Bon appétit!

Creole Louisiana Jambalaya

Ingredients

  • 1 12 oz Family Size box Tony Chachere’s Creole Jambalaya Mix
  • cooking oil (vegetable or olive oil)
  • cayenne
  • ¼ cup butter
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • ¼ cup green onion, diced
  • ½ lb. smoked sausage (pork or beef), coin sliced
  • ½ pound large shrimp (31-40 count)
  • ½ lb. ham slice, cubed 3 ¾ cups water
  • Louisiana Creole seasoning:
    • ½ tsp cayenne
    • 1 tsp paprika
    • ½ tsp dried oregano
    • ½ tsp dried thyme
    • 1 tbsp dried garlic powder
    • ½ tsp black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • ½ tsp onion powder

Directions:

1. Peel and devein shrimp. Season with Louisiana Creole Seasoning. Set aside.

2. In a 4 or 5-quart Dutch oven, sauté yellow onion in oil.

3. In the same pot, brown sausage and ham. Transfer all to a bowl. Set aside.

4. Add 1 12 oz. box of Tony Chachere’s Creole Jambalaya Mix to the pot and 3 ¾ cups water. Stir until well blended.

5. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes until rice is cooked. Most of the water will evaporate.

6. Add meat, seasoned shrimp, and green onion. Cook about another 10 minutes until shrimp are cooked.

7. Add butter, mix well. Add more Creole seasoning and or cayenne to taste.

Holidays, Louisiana, Mardi Gras, Recipes

Easy Peasy Crescent Roll King Cake

This year I’m sharing an easy peasy crescent rolls king cake recipe.

When it was time to make a king cake this year, I couldn’t find Pillsbury Dough Sheets, so this was an opportunity to figure out how to make a king cake with crescent rolls. The stores said they had the inventory, but not enough employees to keep the shelves stocked. YIKES. It takes a little more skill, but it’s still easy peasy!

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 cans Pillsbury Crescent Rolls
  • cinnamon sugar mix: ½ c. granulated sugar + 2 tbsp cinnamon 
  • plastic king cake baby (to hide inside, of course!)
  • purple, green, & gold sugar sprinkles
  • 1 can Pillsbury Cream Cheese Icing or make your own

Directions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 °F (190 °C).
  2. Grease a pizza pan or cover with parchment paper. (Easily transfers to a serving dish using parchment paper.)
  3. Mix the cinnamon and sugar.
  4. Unroll one can of crescent rolls and separate into 8 triangles. Arrange the triangles, slightly overlapping all sides into a half circle with tips pointed toward the center.

5. Finish the circle by laying the triangles from the second can.

6. Sprinkle the cinnamon sugar mix around the middle of the dough.

7. Pull the narrow part of the triangle from the center toward the widest part.

8. Pull the widest part of the triangle from the end toward the center.

9. Bake 25 minutes or until golden brown.

  10. While the cake is in the oven, read THE KING CAKE BABY. Don’t let your baby run away!

Decorate the King Cake

1. Soften ½ can of Pillsbury Cream Cheese icing or make a cream cheese icing using the recipe below.

Cream cheese icing:

  • 3 cups powdered sugar
  • 4oz cream cheese, softened
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract  
  • 3 tablespoons milk

2. Hide one plastic king cake baby in the cake’s underside.

3. While the cake is still warm, pour icing on top.

4. Top with sugar sprinkles, alternating purple, green colors.

5. Before eating, check your piece to see if you got the baby!

And check out my post on how to host an Easy Peasy King Cake Party with pictures.

Bon appétit!

Recipes

Recipe: Pan-seared Parmesan-Panko Rockfish

My father-in-law was an avid fisherman. Every year, he traveled to his fishing camp in Alaska. When my husband and son visited, they fished, too, and brought back King or Sockeye Salmon, Halibut, and Rockfish. Fresh Alaskan fish is so yummy!

After he passed, my boys took Grandpa on one last trip, to spread his ashes on the land he enjoyed, near the river where he fished. Although salmon was his favorite, I think Grandpa would have loved this recipe I am sharing today.

Alaskan Rockfish

Pan Fried Parmesan-Panko Rockfish

Ingredients:

  • 2 8-ounce Rockfish filets
  • 1 cup panko
  • ¾ cup Parmesan cheese, shredded
  • ¼ cup parsley, chopped
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons Mayo
  • salt & pepper
  • garlic powder
  • cayenne pepper
  • vegetable oil for frying

Directions:

  1. Pat rockfish filets with paper towels to dry. This will help the wet mixture cling to the fish.
  2. Mix the first three dry ingredients in a bowl: panko, Parmesan, and parsley.
  3. Mix the wet ingredients in a bowl: egg, mayo, and Dijon mustard.
  4. Season fish with salt, pepper, garlic powder, and cayenne pepper.
  5. Dip filets in the wet mix, then dredge in the dry mixture.
  6. Add oil to a skillet to about 1/4 inch deep. Heat on medium-high.
  7. Fry each filet about 2 minutes on each side.
History, Holidays, Louisiana

12 Days of Christmas

Did you know? Today is the first day of Christmas! The 12 Days of Christmas starts today and ends January 5th.

Many of us know the 12 Days of Christmas song. We know it’s about someone getting lots of gifts, especially birds, from their true love. A wee research led me to a number of ideas about its origin. I found reference to an early written version from 1780 published as a children’s “memory and forfeits” game, much like ‘I went to the market and bought’ game where players are tasked with remembering and repeating what was said before their turn. Others hypothesize it’s an English Christmas carol, a French folk song from 1770, and even a ‘code’ persecuted English Catholics used to practice their faith back in the 16th-17th centuries. A century later, it was described as a game played at a Twelfth-night celebration.

Fast forward to the 19th-20th centuries and the parodies ensued. Watch this family of 12 sing their own version called “Creative 12 Days of Christmas” because it’s hilarious!

https://youtu.be/0L3cdVB3H3I

Although opinions vary about the origin or meaning behind the song, today it’s rooted in both secular and Christian Christmas traditions. And it’s so much fun to sing! Whether the song is enjoyed for a secular or religious reason, we can extend the spirit of the season 12 more days, not only through gift giving but also through acts of kindness. 

And on January 6th, also known as Twelfth Night, Le Petit Noël, Little Christmas, Feast of the Epiphany, or Three Kings’ Day, the celebration continues! More about that later.

I hope you’ll join me!

 

Louisiana, Recipes

Creole Louisiana Mirliton Recipe

Happy fall, y’all!

Today’s post comes with a family recipe for one of my childhood favorite foods. But, we need to dig into some world history first!

What does Latin America, Central America and the Caribbean have to do with my Creole Louisiana Mirlton recipe? Read on…

Mirliton, [MEL-ee-tawn], [MER-lee-tawn], or [MEEL-ee-tawn] in Louisiana, [MEER-lee-tawn] in French, is a south Louisiana staple. The squash, called chayote [chah·YOH·teh] in Spanish, is native to Mesoamerica. This old world plant has documented roots in Louisiana dated in the mid-1800s. However, evidence suggests it reached the Louisiana colony much earlier. In one theory, the plant came to the port city of New Orleans, while a Spanish colony, via other Spanish colonies in Latin America. Another explanation is that it came with colonizers (including gens de couleur libres) and the people they enslaved that fled to New Orleans from Saint-Domingue and Cuba from 1791 to 1815, during and following the slave rebellion that created the Republic of Haiti in 1804. The evidence supporting this latter theory is the fact that there are two places that use the word “mirliton” for this squash—Louisiana and the former French colony renamed Haiti after the revolution. In English, Anglo-Americans call this squash a “vegetable pear” because of its shape. So was the staple called chayote brought to colonial Louisiana during the Spanish period? If so, did the influx of roughly 15,000 French-speakers from Saint-Domingue and Cuba that arrived in New Orleans influence using the French name for the squash? Or was it brought to Louisiana by Saint-Dominguans?

Food history is so fascinating!

This squash is technically a fruit and grows on a vine in warm climates. I remember mirliton growing in my grandmother’s backyard in New Orleans. The plant grew all over the city before Hurricane Katrina decimated the plant. As part of hurricane recovery, a nonprofit organization dedicated itself to the revival and conservation of the Louisiana mirliton.

Чайот.JPG” by SKas is licensed with CC BY-SA 4.0

Below is the recipe passed on to me that I will pass on to my children.

Louisiana Creole Mirliton Recipe

Ingredients and prep:

  • 6-8 medium mirlitons
  • 2 pounds gulf shrimp
  • 1 pound white lump crab meat
  • 1 pound cooked ham, cubed
  • 1 medium bell peppers, diced
  • 1 medium onions, diced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • ½ cup parsley, minced
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 stick butter
  • Louisiana Creole seasoning
    • ½ tsp cayenne
    • 1 tsp paprika
    • ½ tsp dried oregano
    • ½ tsp dried thyme
    • 1 tbsp dried garlic powder
    • ½ tsp black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • ½ tsp onion powder
  • cayenne pepper  to taste
  • Italian bread crumbs

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (176 °C).
  2. Boil whole mirlitons in salted water until tender, about 45 minutes. Remove from water and set aside to cool.
  3. While the mirlitons cool, sauté onion, celery, and bell pepper in butter until soft, about 5 minutes. Add ham, garlic, thyme, and bay leaves. Cook another 20 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle shrimp with Louisiana Creole seasoning. Set aside.
  5. Cut cooled mirlitons in half and remove the seeds and pods. Scoop out the mirliton flesh and place into a colander. Lightly squeeze out excess moisture. TIP: If you want to stuff the shells instead of making a casserole, score on the sides before scooping to leave a little flesh on the sides. The skin tears easily.
  6. Add drained mirlitons to Dutch oven. Add cayenne. TIP: If there’s a lot of water, add a tablespoon of breadcrumbs to thicken or cook on medium-low heat, uncovered, until most of the liquid evaporates.
  7. Add seasoned shrimp. Cook about 20 minutes.
  8. Fold in crabmeat and parsley. Put mixture in mirliton shells.
  9. Top with bread crumbs. Bake for 20-30 minutes or until bread crumbs turn brown.
  10. Serve with Louisiana French Bread or French baguette.

Bon appétit!

OPTION: Make as a casserole.

Picture books, Writing Craft

Reading For Research Author Mentor Text Studies 2020

December – ReFoReMo Best Mentor Texts of 2020

November – Deborah Underwood

October – Margarita Engle

September – Mentor Text Research NO VOICE TOO SMALL Lindsay Metcalf, Keila V. Dawson, Jeanette Bradley

September – Tim McCanna

August – Kevin Henkes

July – Nikki Grimes

June – Kim Norman

April – 2020 ReFoReMo Challenge Reflections

May 2020 – Lesléa Newman

January 2020- Julie Abery

Diverse Books, Picture books

2021 June/July Perfectly Paired PB’s

This month’s reading for research post about picture book pairs on the ReFoReMo blog looks at sports, Pride, and 4th of July.

This new feature, Perfectly Paired Picture Books posts match mentor texts that represent the diverse audience who read the books we write based on similar story elements.

Nonfiction, Picture books

Celebrating Children’s Book Week May -9

Let’s Play! Kidlit For Growing Minds is hosting a 7-DAY 9-BOOK ‘Two Truths and a Lie’ giveaway!

We’re celebrating Children’s Book Week on Twitter, May 3-9. To enter, reply to each author’s original tweet. US educators ONLY. Winner selected every 48 hours!

Check out our Twitter page, @ForGrowingMinds, where we will retweet but don’t forget to reply to the original author’s tweet. Join us!

Media

2021 Opening the Road Book Tour & Interviews

Blogging about my OPENING THE ROAD!

12 X 12 December Featured Author – Keila Dawson
Diverse Books, Nonfiction, Picture books

OPENING THE ROAD

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL: 

“Dawson’s text makes a stark, complex topic accessible and comprehensible to younger readers.”

VERDICT A compelling picture book that introduces the history of segregation and its impact in the U. S. to young readers.–Hilary Tufo, Columbus ­Metropolitan Lib., Reynoldsburg, OH

From a presentation on OPENING THE ROAD, students learn:

-the untold story of Victor Hugo Green’s contribution to history, making it a great foray into lessons on equity and social justice for young learners

-how to make historical connections from the past text to today

-the vocabulary needed to understand complex concepts in the long road toward seeking social justice

-to use skills in cause and effect connecting historical events and their impact on Black Americans.

-how research is used to write fiction and nonfiction stories

WHAT I DO AT SCHOOL VISITS:

-Discuss the importance of stories about unsung heroes like Victor Hugo Green.

-Introduce concepts and vocabulary needed to understand the story.

-Read OPENING THE ROAD.

-Discuss research methods, obstacles, and my writing process.

-Share an activity to make a real life connection to the story.

-Leave time for Q&A

ADDITONAL CONTENT:

Educational Guide with standards-aligned  Educational Activity Guide

Flipgrid Discovery LibraryOPENING THE ROAD has topics for students to explore in the Discovery Library. Parents and educators can access videos, and mini lessons specific to the topics, content and vocabulary used in the book. Readers can watch and respond to the videos with their own recordings and writings! For privacy, teachers can copy this module into their own classroom Flipgrid sites. 

ENDORSEMENTS:

“This intricately illustrated and inspiring book reveals the courageous spirit of Victor Hugo Green and reminds us that within us all lies the power to change the world.” —Oge Mora, author and illustrator of Thank You, Omu; Saturday; and The Oldest Student

“Opening the Road is a story of resilience in the Black American tradition of ‘making a way out of no way’–that is, challenging the limits of racism through ingenuity, community, and hope.” —Veronica Miller Jamison, illustrator of A Computer Called Katherine

“In Opening the Road, author Keila Dawson opens children’s eyes to the dangers of segregation and the power of the human spirit to resist and find detours around injustice.” –Nancy Churnin, award-winning author of Manjhi Moves a Mountain and The William Hoy Story

“This road trip into history detailing Victor Green’s efforts to bypass racial discrimination when traveling is a welcome companion to the stories of Rosa Parks and Elizabeth Jennings.” –Beth Anderson, author of Lizzie Demands a Seat and An Inconvenient Alphabet

Author visits, Picture books, School Visits

World Read Aloud Day 2021!

Happy World Read Aloud Day! I had a blast virtually visiting with students from the West Coast to the East Coast today. I enjoy interacting with curious kids.

And they never surprise me with their comments or questions!

These are from today:

“I’m a YouTuber, I know all about editing 24/7.”

“Do you get paid by each book you sell?”

🤣

I admit, I chuckled at the YouTuber but then asked for her name and wrote it down! You never know.

I got a WRAD Challenge from a friend to make a video about what I’m doing today. Here it is. Happy reading!

History, Media, Nonfiction

Happy Book Birthday to OPENING THE ROAD!

To celebrate OPENING THE ROAD: VICTOR HUGO GREEN AND HIS GREEN BOOK, I created a video using Doodly. And below the video find FREE content for curious kids I created to use with the book in the classroom.

I can’t wait to hit the road with Victor’s story. Let’s go!

Activism, Diverse Books, Nonfiction, Picture books

OPENING THE ROAD Educator’s Guide

It’s a long, winding road toward social justice. Keep going!

Click on the cover for a free classroom guide to use with OPENING THE ROAD: VICTOR HUGO GREEN AND HIS GREEN BOOK.

Activism, Media, Nonfiction

The Classroom Bookshelf features NO VOICE TOO SMALL

So honored that The Classroom Bookshelf, an SLJ blog, wrote an extensive article on how to use NO VOICE TOO SMALL in the classroom to lift student voices! A great resource and extension to the book’s free activity guide.

Author visits, Louisiana, Mardi Gras, Picture books, School Visits

Kings’ Day School Visit

It was a pleasure to have Keila V. Dawson speak to my Kindergarten class about her book The King Cake Baby! She really connected with my kids and had them saying words in French by the end of her visit.  She inspired us to write our own class book!” Elizabeth Gates, Kindergarten teacher, Rothenberg Academy, Cincinnati Public Schools.

On January 6th, the first day of Carnival, I had the pleasure of virtually visiting with Kindergarten students at Rothenberg Academy in Cincinnati. We compared Cincinnati to New Orleans and talked about things that are the same and different. Ok, mostly we talked about food!

And I read THE KING CAKE BABY. So happy to have inspired them to write their own stories, and I can’t wait to read them!

Picture books, Writing Craft

Mentor Text Talk: OPENING THE ROAD

Today on the Reading for Research Month (ReFoReMo) blog, I share how I used mentor texts to write OPENING THE ROAD: VICTOR HUGO GREEN AND HIS GREEN BOOK. Coming to a shelf near you this month!

History, Nonfiction, Picture books

Unboxing OPENING THE ROAD!

Unboxing is popular among authors after receiving their author copies. So here’s my unboxing video of my new book releasing January 26, 2021!

OPENING THE ROAD: VICTOR HUGO GREEN AND HIS GREEN BOOK is the untold true story of the mail carrier who wrote the Green Book travel guides published from 1936 to 1966 that African Americans used to plan safe road trips & vacations when they didn’t have the freedom to go anywhere they wanted.

Beaming Books | ISBN: 978-1506467917
40 pages | ages 4-98

January 26, 2021

Pre-order wherever books are sold!

Bookshop | Beaming Books | Amazon | B&N

Diverse Books, Picture books

Multicultural Children’s Book Day

I’m thrilled to support the Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2021 campaign as an Author Sponsor. Read reviews on January 29th!

From the publisher:

“Hungry? Check the Green Book. Tired? Check the Green Book. Sick? Check the Green Book.”

In the late 1930s when segregation was legal and Black Americans couldn’t visit every establishment or travel everywhere they wanted to safely, a New Yorker named Victor Hugo Green decided to do something about it. Green wrote and published a guide that listed places where his fellow Black Americans could be safe in New York City. The guide sold like hotcakes! Soon customers started asking Green to make a guide to help them travel and vacation safely across the nation too. With the help of his mail carrier co-workers and the African American business community, Green’s guide allowed millions of African Americans to travel safely and enjoy traveling across the nation. For grades K-3rd. Available in ebook and hardcover form.

Find more Author Sponsors at the MCBD blog.

Author visits, Media

2020 Book Tour & Interviews

Click on each image to access a few interviews, videos, and more!

We discuss our No Voice Too Small Book Club featured in the Flipgrid Discovery Library!

Check out this Buckeye Book Fair YouTube introduction to No Voice Too Small.

How to introduce activism to young kids. Asked and answered!

Kidquake Sizzle Reel!

Kidquake presentation.

View More